Understanding The Limitation Of The “Grid Test “For Judging Lens Quality

By Dick Whitney – Carl Zeiss Vision, ANSI Z80.1 Chair / Vision Council Lens Tech Committee Chair/ Exec Director of Optical Heritage Museum
Monday, November 21, 2016 12:10 AM

With the growth of the Optical Heritage Museum over the last 3 years (thanks to my company Zeiss who sponsors it), I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to study much of the content of our vast collection of Ophthalmic lens advertising materials. These date back to before the turn of the 20th Century. Our archives house a very unique library of materials; and one thing I have been struck with is the many parallels between how we market lens products then vs now.

Big Or Small? One Size Doesn’t Fit All

By Alex Bennett, ABOC
Monday, November 14, 2016 12:10 AM

Patients come in all different sizes, which can make fitting frames and lenses a dynamic process. Thankfully, the industry has solved many of these problems in a variety of ways. From large to small, manufacturers have an array of frames to fit every sized head.

Coping With Corridors, Part Three

By Barry Santini, ABOM
Monday, November 7, 2016 12:15 AM

In traditional progressive lenses, the designer defines a series of performance goals, including a target corridor length and reading add, fixed lens areas, along with a merit weighting of various optical errors, and then enters into an iterative process to figure out which elements of progressive surface should be manipulated to achieve these goals.

Coping With Corridors, Part Two

By Barry Santini, ABOM
Monday, October 31, 2016 10:10 AM To begin the choice of a corridor length, start with your fitting height, and subtract 4mm to 5 mm, which allocates enough height for a minimum useful reading area. The difference left is a good approximate number to begin determining your target corridor length.

Coping With Corridors, Part One

By Barry Santini, ABOM
Monday, October 24, 2016 10:08 AM In the new millennium, as free-form manufacturing overcame the economic and logistic limitations imposed by traditional progressive production, a cornucopia of lens design choices unfolded on the optical market.

Key Into Lifestyles and Boost Sports Sunwear Sales

By Lina T. Arango, OD
Monday, October 17, 2016 12:15 AM Eyewear that suits the needs of sports-active patients is a growing opportunity. I know this both as an OD, and as an athlete myself. As a triathlete, I am active in the sports community of Miami, where I practice. This is an area in which an outdoors lifestyle is the norm, with many of my patients participating in everything from marathons and triathlons to boating.

Cleaning Up at the Office: Glasses Washing and You

By Preston Fassel, BS
Monday, October 10, 2016 12:05 AM

Recently, inspiration struck me—as it often does—in the shower. Well, getting out of the shower, this time. I’d actually remembered to take my glasses off, and, as I was reaching for them on the bathroom counter, accidentally knocked them into the trash. As luck would have it, I’d actually washed out the bathroom trash can earlier that afternoon, but, even though it was freshly clean and completely empty, my half-controlled mysophobia wouldn’t let me just take them out and put them back on. After giving the frames and lenses a thorough cleaning, I felt safe again. Then, it occurred to me what a horrible mistake I’d been making for so many years. Weren’t my frames dirty more often than that?

It's Jetsons!

By Barry Santini, ABOM
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 11:10 AM

Technology-driven change has been impacting the optical field for years. From smartphone auto refractors to Optos imaging, it's "out with the old and in with the new!" But despite the onward march of new tech, the ins and outs of choosing and fitting frames has hardly been impacted at all. Sure, virtual try on (VTO) frame technology popped up...but it also popped back. It seemed safe to say that the gold standard of in-person try on, consultation and frame fitting would never be surpassed.

Progressive Lenses – What’s Driving Your Vision?

By Alexander Bennett, ABOC
Monday, September 19, 2016 9:05 AM

Lens technology is currently progressing (pun intended) at a rapid rate. New lenses and technology are commonplace in the industry - but not always known to the consumer. It’s funny, when I ask a patient how they’ve enjoyed their lenses and if they’d like to learn about new options they’re usually confused. When I mention how many different varieties of lenses there are they typically answer “Don’t I wear a Zeiss lens?”

Darryl Meister’s Educational Forum – The Importance of Understanding Color Deficiency

By Mindi Lewis, MA, ABOC, FNAO
Monday, August 29, 2016 1:15 PM

It is my honor and pleasure to publish in today’s Opticians Handbook eblast the first of what I hope will be many more research papers submitted by students or their instructors of vision science in the Darryl Meister Educational Forum section.

The Importance of Understanding Color Vision Deficiency

By Brianna Bischoff
Ophthalmic Science Student, Raritan Valley Community College

Monday, August 29, 2016 1:05 PM The eye is a complex piece of anatomy capable of determining everything from broad shapes to precise details. Among the many tasks the eye is able to perform, one of the eye’s key tasks is to aid in the determination of the many variations of color.

The 21st Century Optician

By Maggie Sayers, ABOM
Monday, August 22, 2016 12:14 AM My personal career in the retail optical industry has spanned more than 40 years. I have seen amazing changes. When I started my training in Germany in 1973, we used glass lenses exclusively. CR39 was just coming on the market, and they were only used for safety reasons in children’s glasses. The optical quality of plastic lenses was clearly substandard, in our opinion, at that time.

Befuddled By Blue, Part Three

By By Deb Kotob, ABOM
Education Facilitator, Vision Ease Lens

Monday, August 22, 2016 12:13 AM

In Befuddled by Blue, Part One, we learned that blue light filters that can be used indoors don’t provide a significant reduction in the blue light that disrupts normal sleep patterns. We also learned that the science is not yet available to allow us to conclude that the small dose of blue light emitted from digital device screens is a significant risk to eye health. Yet, we believe that recommending lenses that can be used indoors to reduce high energy wavelengths is a good precautionary measure, as long as the patient is educated on the greatest threat for high energy light damage to the eye, the sun.

 

Go Back to School…Vegas Style

By Jodi Groh
Monday, August 15, 2016 12:15 AM

Vision Expo is right around the corner. Hopefully you’ve already made your travel plans. Next on the agenda is your strategy. What do you want to accomplish while you’re there? From courses to the exhibit hall, events to parties, and let’s not forget the night life, a few days in Vegas may feel like a whirlwind. Take full advantage of the many opportunities by planning ahead: register for classes, note which companies you want to see, and schedule appointments when possible.

Befuddled By Blue, Part Two

By By Deb Kotob, ABOM
Education Facilitator, Vision Ease Lens

Monday, August 15, 2016 12:10 AM

In Part One of Befuddled by Blue,  we learned that blue light filters, that can be used indoors, don’t provide a significant reduction in the blue light that disrupts normal sleep patterns. We also learned that the science is not yet available to allow us to conclude that the small dose of blue light emitted from digital device screens is a significant risk to eye health. Yet, we believe that recommending lenses that can be used indoors to reduce high energy wavelengths is a good precautionary measure, as long as the patient is educated on the greatest threat for high energy light damage to the eye, the sun. 

 

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